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Timi

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  1. Timi

    Hi, I'm new!

    Hi everyone, I just wanted to introduce myself as I'm new here and hope to learn a lot from you all. My name is Timi and I'm not a chemical engineer—however, I produce innovation reports and competitive analyses for chemical engineers. I try to spend as much time as possible among chemists and chemicals-focussed professionals so I can learn what matters to you and provide value wherever I can. If you have any questions, just ask!
  2. Hi everyone, Chemistry World (Royal Society of Chemistry) is running a free webinar on the topic, “How to extract invaluable answers from chemical patents using software”: https://www.chemistryworld.com/webinars/the-easy-way-to-find-chemical-gold-in-patents/3008593.article Everyone who registers will also get a free illustrative guide, which provides a framework for easily analysing Markush structures found in chemical patents. Or, if I get enough responses, I'll just share the PDF here. This is a great companion piece to the webinar. Don’t worry if you won’t be able to attend on the day, register anyway—a recording will be sent to all registrants. As a side note, do you know many (or any) chemists or chemicals-focussed professionals who look at chemical patents to: 1.) Understand trends in chemical syntheses within their niche—especially in relation to the compounds being synthesised and the processes involved 2.) Competitor activities and threats to the viability of their projects 3.) Uncover every drug candidate used for particular medical conditions, during clinical trials 4.) Learn experimental procedures for synthesised compounds, as well as biological data, 1H/13C NMR details, physicochemical studies and intended usage Probably not many—which is a shame. Chemical patents can help you do all the above and more. You can’t copy an invention—but you can use the invaluable information disclosed in chemical patents to solve countless problems. In 1994, Avery Dennison used data from chemical patents to push Dow out of manufacturing a new type of film for product labelling—it made $100s million in the process. Do you have any experience using information from chemical patents? Or do you think they’re just boring legal documents? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.
  3. Hi everyone, Chemistry World (Royal Society of Chemistry) is running a free webinar on the topic, “How to extract invaluable answers from chemical patents using software”: https://www.chemistryworld.com/webinars/the-easy-way-to-find-chemical-gold-in-patents/3008593.article Everyone who registers will also get a free illustrative guide, which provides a framework for easily analysing Markush structures found in chemical patents. Or, if I get enough responses, I'll just share the PDF here. This is a great companion piece to the webinar. Don’t worry if you won’t be able to attend on the day, register anyway—a recording will be sent to all registrants. As a side note, do you know many (or any) chemists or chemicals-focussed professionals who look at chemical patents to: 1.) Understand trends in chemical syntheses within their niche—especially in relation to the compounds being synthesised and the processes involved 2.) Competitor activities and threats to the viability of their projects 3.) Uncover every drug candidate used for particular medical conditions, during clinical trials 4.) Learn experimental procedures for synthesised compounds, as well as biological data, 1H/13C NMR details, physicochemical studies and intended usage Probably not many—which is a shame. Chemical patents can help you do all the above and more. You can’t copy an invention—but you can use the invaluable information disclosed in chemical patents to solve countless problems. In 1994, Avery Dennison used data from chemical patents to push Dow out of manufacturing a new type of film for product labelling—it made $100s million in the process. Do you have any experience using information from chemical patents? Or do you think they’re just boring legal documents? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.
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